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Reading Alert: Forest Gander 3/22 @6PM

In Reading Alerts on February 20, 2018 at 2:32 pm

Felix & the Center for Culture, History, and the Environment present….

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Poet & Essayist Forrest Gander

Thursday, 3/22 at 6PM

A Room of One’s Own bookstore
315 W. Gorham St.

This event is free and open to the public. This event is thanks to the generous sponsorship of the UW-Madison English department, the Anonymous Fund, and the Center for Culture, History, and the Environment at the Nelson Insititute (CHE).

Guest Biography:

 

The celebrated Forrest Gander, a writer, translator and editor of several anthologies of writing from Spain and Mexico, is known for the richness of his language and his undaunted lyric passion. He is the author of more than a dozen books, including collaborations with notable artists and photographers.

Concerned with the way we are revised and translated in encounters with the foreign, his wide-ranging poetry volume Core Samples from the World (2011)—a collaboration studded with the work of three great photographers, Graciela Iturbide, Raymond Meeks, and Lucas Foglia—was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Other poetry collections include Eye Against Eye, with photographs by Sally Mann; Torn Awake; and Science & Steepleflower. His next collection of poetry, Be With, is forthcoming in May of 2018. He is the author of the essay collection Faithful Existence: Reading, Memory & Transcendence. Other essays have appeared in The Nation, The Boston Review, the New York Times Book Review, and more.

Gander’s two novels are the gemlike debut As A Friend (2008) and The Trace (2014). In As A Friend, he explores the valences of friendship: eroticism, jealousy, emulation, compassion, betrayal, and loyalty. Jeanette Winterson, in her New York Times review, wrote “In this strange and beautiful novel as in life, love is part of what is sacred. Through love we get a chance to see past our own boundaries — not only into the life of another, but to the edge of life too: the last step off the seeming-solid into the weightlessness of death, its free form.” The Trace is a poetic novel about a couple journeying through Mexico, recovering from a world shattered when the car breaks down in the middle of the Chihuahua Desert. Jason Diamond calls the novel a “gorgeous portrait of what some people will do to come to grips with tragedy.”

A translator of international renown, Gander’s translations include Alice, Iris, Red Horse: Selected Poems of Gozo YoshimasuThen Come Back: The Lost Poems of Pablo NerudaFungus Skull Eye Wing: Selected Poems of Alfonso D’Aquino which was longlisted for the PEN Award for Poetry in Translation; Pinholes in the Night: Essential Poems from Latin America (with Raúl Zurita); Watchword, the Villaurrutia Award-winning book by Mexican Poet Laureate Pura Lopez Colome; Spectacle & Pigsty (with Kyoko Yoshida), selected poems by contemporary Japanese poet Kiwao Nomura, which won the Best Translated Book Award for 2012; Firefly Under the Tongue: Selected Poems of Coral Bracho, which was a finalist for the PEN Translation Prize; and (with Kent Johnson) The Night by Jaime Saenz.

In 2008, Gander was named a United States Artists Rockefeller Fellow, one of 50 artists to be recognized for artistic excellence, unique artistic vision, and significant contributions to their fields. Gander is also the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Guggenheim, Howard, Whiting, and United States Artists Foundations. He has been a Library of Congress/Witter Bynner fellow and a finalist for the Pulitzer and National Book Critics Circle awards.

Gander was a Briggs-Copeland Poet at Harvard University before becoming the A.K. Seaver Professor of Literary Arts & Comparative Literature at Brown University where he taught with his wife, the poet C.D. Wright, for more than twenty years. He lives and works now in Petaluma, California.

“The quiet complexity of his syntax can build striking abstract landscapes in which the material and spiritual worlds seem equally intelligent.” —Tony Hoagland

Gander’s [poems] plunge and swoop up and down the whole scale of earthy, earthly, cerebral, and celestial experience. The ride is for the most part thrilling.” —The Boston Book Review

Gander’s poetic writing lends this adventure story [The Trace] a dense, brooding atmosphere; his characters’ troubles unfold slowly in this carefully crafted novel of intimacy and isolation.” –The New Yorker

Learn more: http://forrestgander.com/bio.html  

http://blueflowerarts.com/artist/forrest-gander/ 

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Reading Alert: Poet Ada Limón 2/1 @7PM

In Reading Alerts on January 23, 2018 at 5:32 pm

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Felix & UW Creative Writing Presents: Poet Ada Limón

Thursday, 2/1 at 7PM

Madison Public Library Community Room, 3rd floor
Central Branch, 201 W Mifflin St.

Free and open to the public.

Ada Limón is the author of four books of poetry, including Bright Dead Things, which was named a finalist for the 2015 National Book Award in Poetry, a finalist for the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award, a finalist for the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award, and one of the Top Ten Poetry Books of the Year by The New York Times. Her other books include Lucky WreckThis Big Fake World, and Sharks in the Rivers. She serves on the faculty of Queens University of Charlotte Low Residency M.F.A program, and the 24Pearl Street online program for the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center. She also works as a freelance writer splitting her time between Lexington, Kentucky and Sonoma, California.

For more see, http://adalimon.com/

Felix & UW Creative Writing Presents: Rickey Laurentiis 11/30 @ 7PM

In Reading Alerts on November 18, 2017 at 11:12 am

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Felix & UW Creative Writing Presents: Poet Rickey Laurentiis

Thursday, 11/30 at 7PM

Madison Public Library Community Room, 3rd floor
Central Branch, 201 W Mifflin St.

Free and open to the public.

Rickey Laurentiis (b. 1989) was raised in New Orleans, Louisiana, to love the dark. His poetry has been supported by several foundations and fellowships, including the Lannan Literary Foundation (2017), Civitella Ranieri Foundation in Italy (2014), Poetry International Rotterdam (2014), the National Endowment for the Arts (2013), Cave Canem Foundation (2009-2011), and the Poetry Foundation, which awarded him a Ruth Lilly Fellowship in 2012. In 2016, he traveled to Palestine as an invited reader for the Palestine Festival of Literature. He received his MFA in Writing from Washington University in St Louis, where he was a Chancellor’s Graduate Fellow, and his Bachelors in Liberal Arts from Sarah Lawrence College, where he read literature and queer theory.

 

He is the author of Boy with Thorn, winner of the Cave Canem Poetry Prize and the Levis Reading Prize, and a finalist for the Kate Tufts Discovery award, as well as named one of the top ten debuts of 2015 by Poets & Writers Magazine and a top 16 best poetry books by Buzzfeed, among other distinctions. Individual poems have appeared widely, including  Boston Review, Feminist Studies, The Kenyon Review, The Los Angeles Review of Books Quarterly, New Republic, The New York Times, and Poetry; have been anthologized in Extraordinary Rendition: (American) Writers Speak of Palestine, Bettering American Poetry, A Tale of Two Americas: Stories of Inequality in a Divided Nation, and Prospect.3‘s art catalogue Notes for Now; as well as translated into Arabic, Spanish and Ukrainian.

Laurentiis’ interests include visual culture, ekphrasis, shade, revisionary logics, penetration and the body, radical justice, cultural studies and shame. He has taught at a selection of institutions, including Columbia University, Sarah Lawrence College, and the 92nd Street Y. He is the inaugural Fellow in Creative Writing at the Center for African American Poetry and Poetics at the University of Pittsburgh.

For more information, see http://www.rickeylaurentiis.com/about

 

 

Jane Wong: April 28th, 2017

In Reading Alerts on April 11, 2017 at 8:31 am

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Felix Presents: Jane Wong

April 28th, Friday, 4PM.

6191, Helen C. White Hall
The University of Wisconsin-Madison

Free and open to the public.

Jane Wong holds an M.F.A. in Poetry from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and a Ph.D. in English from the University of Washington. She is a former U.S. Fulbright Fellow and Kundiman Fellow. She is the recipient of scholarships from the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, Squaw Valley, and the Fine Arts Work Center. The recipient of The American Poetry Review’s 2016 Stanley Kunitz Memorial Prize, poems have appeared in journals such as Pleiades, The Volta, Third Coast, and the anthologies Best American Poetry 2015 (Scribner), Best New Poets 2012 (The University of Virginia Press) and The Arcadia Project: North American Postmodern Pastoral (Ahsahta Press). She is the author of OVERPOUR (Action Books). Currently, she is a Visiting Assistant Professor at Pacific Lutheran University and teaches Creative Writing and Asian American Studies and will be an Assistant Professor at Western Washington in the fall.

This event is generously sponsored by the UW-Madison English Department and the Anonymous Fund.

Find out more about Jane and her work at http://janewong.tumblr.com/

CM Burroughs: February 24th, 2017

In Reading Alerts on January 24, 2017 at 3:46 pm

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Felix Presents: Poet CM Burroughs

February 24th, Friday, 7PM.

ART + LIT LAB
2021 Winnebago St.

Free and open to the public.

Contemporary American poet CM Burroughs will read from her works, followed by a brief Q&A. The event is organized by the curators of the Felix New Writing series hosted at UW-Madison. This is event is generously funded by the UW-Madison English department & the Anonymous Fund.

CM BURROUGHS is the author of “The Vital System” (2012) and has works published in various publications, such as Ploughshares and Best American Experimental Writing (2016). Burroughs’ poems explore and complicate the intersections of race, desire, embodiment, and loss. Such interests spark some surprising voices in her poem. For example, in “Dear incubator” the speaker shares,

“How can I ask you from inside the poem—what senses did I have so early…so unformed.”

Burroughs currently teaches as assistant professor of poetry at Columbia College in Chicago. In addition to receiving multiple grants and fellowships she’s crafted poems in response to art installations at both the Studio Museum of Harlem and the Warhol Museum.

Eileen Myles: November 9, 2016

In Reading Alerts on September 27, 2016 at 9:47 pm

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Felix Presents: Eileen Myles

Wednesday, November 9, 7:00 pm
The Bubbler, Central Library (201 W Mifflin St, Madison)
Free and open to the public

Eileen Myles was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1949, attended Catholic schools in Arlington, and graduated from the University of Massachusetts (Boston) in 1971. They came to New York in 1974 to be a poet. Their poetic education primarily took place at St. Mark’s Poetry Project from 1975 to 1977, through attending readings and participating in workshops led by Alice Notley, Ted Berrigan, and Paul Violi. From 1984 to 1986 Eileen was the artistic director of St. Mark’s Poetry Project. Myles is the author of nineteen books including I Must Be Living Twice: New & Selected Poems, and a reissue of Chelsea Girls, both out in fall 2015, from Ecco/Harper Collins. They are the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship in non-fiction, an Andy Warhol/Creative Capital art writers’ grant, a Lambda Book Award, the Shelley Prize from The Poetry Society of America, as well as being named to the Slate/Whiting Second Novel List. Currently they teach at NYU and Naropa University and lives in Marfa, TX and New York.

Stephen Burt: October 27, 2016

In Reading Alerts on September 27, 2016 at 9:33 pm

 

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A Poetry Reading by Stephen Burt

Thursday, October 27, 4:00 pm
Rm 126 Memorial Library (728 State St, Madison)
Free and open to the public

Book signing to follow

Stephen Burt is Professor of English at Harvard University, and has authored three poetry collections (Belmont, Parallel Play, and Popular Music) and several collections of critical works. His essay collection Close Calls with Nonsense was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. His other works include The Art of the Sonnet; Something Understood: Essays and Poetry for Helen Vendler; The Forms of Youth: Adolescence and 20th Century Poetry; Parallel Play: Poems; Randall Jarrell on W. H. Auden; and Randall Jarrell and His Age. His writing has appeared in the New York Times Book Review, the London Review of Books, the Times Literary Supplement, The Believer, and the Boston Review. His most recent publication, The Poem Is You: Sixty Contemporary American Poems and How to Read Them, is published by Harvard University Press, and he is currently working on a project called Don’t Read Poetry (A Book About How to Read Poems).

Dawn Lundy Martin: April 20, 2016

In Reading Alerts on April 11, 2016 at 2:55 pm

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An Evening with Dawn Lundy Martin

Wednesday, April 20, 7:30 pm
L150 Elvehjem Building (800 University Ave, Madison)
Free and open to the public

Please join us for the final Felix reading of this season! No RSVP required, but a Facebook event is available here if you would like to use it to save the date and/or invite your friends.

Dawn Lundy Martin is the author of three books of poetry, and three chapbooks. Of her latest collection, Life in a Box is a Pretty Life (Nightboat Books 2015), Fred Moten says, “Imagine Holiday singing a blind alley, or Brooks pricing hardpack dandelion, and then we’re seized and thrown into the festival of detonation we hope we’ve been waiting for.” Associate Professor in the English Department at the University of Pittsburgh, Martin is a member of the three-person performance group, The Black Took Collective. She is also a member of the global artist collective, HOWDOYOUSAYYAMINAFRICAN?, the group that withdrew its work from the 2014 Whitney Biennial to protest the museum’s biased curatorial practices. Martin is currently working on a hybrid memoir, a tiny bit of which appears in “The Long Road to Angela Davis’s Library,” published in The New Yorker in December 2014.

Brian Kim Stefans: April 8, 2016

In Reading Alerts on March 28, 2016 at 4:53 pm

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An Evening with Brian Kim Stefans 

Friday, April 8, 7:30 pm
Rainbow Bookstore Cooperative (426 W Gilman St, Madison)
Free and open to the public

Brian Kim Stefans is a digital and procedural poet and Assistant Professor of English at UCLA. He is the author of many books, including “Viva Miscegenation”: New Writing (MakeNow Books, 2013), Kluge: A Meditation and other works (Roof Books, 2007), What Is Said to the Poet Concerning Flowers (Heretical Texts, 2006), Angry Penguins (Harry Tankoos Books, 2000), Gulf (Object Editions, 1998), and Free Space Comix (Roof, 1998). Along with several chapbooks of poetry, his other books include Before Starting Over: Selected Interviews and Essays 1994-2005 (Salt Publishing, 2006) and Fashionable Noise: On Digital Poetics (Atelos, 2003), which includes experimental essays on the role of algorithm in poetry and culture. Brian Kim Stefans also runs the prescient and popular poetics website http://www.arras.net/, which has been active since 1998.

Bruce Andrews: March 3, 2016

In Reading Alerts on February 22, 2016 at 1:58 pm

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Bruce Andrews: Poetry as Praxis

Thursday, March 3, 7:00 pm
Madison Central Library (201 W Mifflin St), Room 302
Free and open to the public

Bruce Andrews is a New York City-based poet, performance writer, literary theorist & recently retired left-wing political science professor. As Musical Director for Sally Silvers & Dancers, he has created sound designs and live mixes of music & text for over two decades of performances. From 1978 to 1981, Andrews, along with poet and scholar Charles Bernstein, edited the magazine L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E, which galvanized a new and politically engaged literary avant-garde that would become known as “Language poetry.” Although Language poetry transformed the landscape of American poetry, Andrews’ work has never been limited by disciplinary boundaries. His work as a sound designer, music director, multimedia writer, theorist, and political scientist are all integrated into a continued interrogation of the connections between art, politics, and social life. The most recent of his dozen or so books is You Can’t Have Everything… Where Would You Put It! from Veer Books in London.